Members

Current members of The Second World War Military Operations Research Group

Dr Harry Bennett is an Associate Professor in History at Plymouth University. He has published on aspects of the Air, Land and Sea campaigns in the Second World War. His books include Destination Normandy: Three American Regiments on D-Day (Praeger, 2006), [with R. Bennett] Survivors: British Merchant Seamen in the Second World War (Hambledon, 1999) and The RAF’s French Foreign Legion: De Gaulle, the British and the Rebirth of French Airpower 1940-1945 (Continuum, 2012). He is one of the series editors for the Britannia Naval Histories of World War II being published by the University of Plymouth Press. (Webpage)

Dr Jonathan Boff (Webpage)

Jonny Briggs

Professor Lloyd Clark (Webpage)

Alexander Clarke is a PhD candidate within the Department of War Studies, King’s College London where Professor Andrew Lambert supervises him. His PhD thesis, entitled ‘What Value the Dark Blue Sky?’ is an examination of the development of British Naval Aviation in the 1920s and 30s. He has written articles for Warship International Fleet Review, an active member of the Phoenix Think Tank, and maintains his own blog. His current research focuses on the period of transition and development within the Royal Navy before and after the Second World War. Additionally, he is interested in International Power Projection and International Relations, Amphibious Operations and Expeditionary Warfare, Carrier Operations and the Development of Naval Aviation, Evolution and Development of Unmanned Systems, and Equipment Design and Procurement.

Neal Dando is a PhD student at Plymouth University. His thesis is entitled, Tobruk to Tunis: The impact of topography and improvisation on British doctrine and tactics, North Africa 1940-1943, under the supervision of Dr Harry Bennett. This work re-appraises the impact of terrain on operations from the strategic to the tactical level. His research interests include the British Army 1940-43, including command, operations and doctrine, linked to aspects of the campaigns in the Mediterranean and Middle East. His first article was completed with Professor O.S.K.Tarin, entitled, ‘Memoirs of the Second World War – Major Shaukat Hyat Khan’ in the Journal of the Indian Military Historical Society in 2010. A paper given in 2011, entitled, ‘From ‘Jock Column’ to Armoured Column: transformation and change in British and Commonwealth unit tactics, in the Western Desert, January 1941 to November 1942,’ will be published in Ross Mahoney, Stuart Mitchell and Michael LoCicero, (Eds.) A Military Transformed?: Innovation and Adaptation in the British Military, 1792-1945 and is due to be published in 2013.

Paul Devine is a PhD student at Plymouth University. He is currently writing a thesis which explores the British way of war at brigade and battalion level in North West Europe between June 1944 and March 1945. The units in question belong to two infantry divisions; the 43rd (Wessex) and the 53rd (Welsh). This study examines how these units managed their operations as the campaign progressed, the main strands of inquiry being; command and control; preparations for assaults; liaison and relationship between infantry and supporting armour; supporting artillery; casualty management and, of course, how the infantryman fought his war. Aside from military history, Paul also has interests in early modern and modern British history.

Dr Marcus Faulkner

Dr Jonathan Fennell

Dr Matthew Ford is Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Sussex. Prior to completing his PhD in War Studies from King’s College London, he worked for a global management consultancy. Subsequently a Strategic Analyst with the Policy and Capability Studies Department of DSTL, an agency of the UK Ministry of Defence, his research interests focus on military innovation, socio-technical change, the social construction of military effects and strategy. He has taught at King’s College London and Birkbeck College, read philosophy at the University of Reading and holds an MA in War Studies from King’s College London. He is a West Point Fellow and winner of the Society for Military History’s Russell F. Weigley Graduate award. He is the co-editor of an forthcoming volume on Allied Fighting Effectiveness in North Africa and Italy, 1942 to 1945 to be published by Brill.

Mark Frost

Dr Bryn Hammond is Head of Collections at the Imperial War Museums. His interests lie in operational analysis and the study of tactical development in the two world wars. He is a member of the British Commission for Military History and the Western Front and Gallipoli Associations. His publications include, Cambrai 1917: The Myth of the First Great Tank Battle (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2008) and, El Alamein: The Battle that Turned the Tide of the Second World War (Osprey, 2012). Additionally he is the author of Practical Considerations in British Tank Operations on the Western Front, 1916-1918, Working Paper in Military and International History No. 2 (University of Salford, 2011), ‘Professionals and Specialists: Military Mining on the Western Front, 1914-1918’, Imperial War Museum Review, No. 6 (1991) and ‘General Harper and the Failure of 51st (Highland) Division at Cambrai, 20 November 1917’, Imperial War Museum Review, No. 10 (1995).

Dr Richard Hammond is Lecturer in Strategic Studies for the University of Portsmouth, based at RAF College Cranwell. He graduated with his PhD from the University of Exeter in 2011, on the subject of ‘The British Anti-Shipping Campaign in the Mediterranean, 1940-1944’. He also holds a BA(Hons) War Studies and an MA Conflict Studies from the University of Wolverhampton, where he worked as a Visiting Lecturer from 2011-2013. He has published an article on ‘British Policy on Total Maritime Warfare and the Anti-Shipping Campaign in the Mediterranean, 1940-1944’ in the Journal of Strategic Studies and has written a chapter on British aero-naval co-operation in the Mediterranean for the forthcoming collection on A Military Transformed? Innovation and Adaptation in the British Military, 1792 – 1945 (Helion, 2013).

Dr Stephen Hart is currently (as of July 2013) serving as acting Deputy Head in the Department of War Studies at The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. His main research interests are the Normandy and north-west European campaigns (1944-45), the British and German Armies and their operations during the Second World War, the Holocaust, and the 1990-1991 Gulf War. He is currently working, as co-author, on The Ruined the Reich: The Military Defeat of North-western Germany, April-May 1945 for Pearson Education. His other publications include: The Road to Falaise, Battle Zone Normandy Series No.13 (Stroud: Sutton, 2004); Montgomery and “Colossal Cracks”: The 21st Army Group in Northwest Europe, 1944-45 (Westport, CT.: Praeger, 2000) (Revised Paperback Edition published as “Colossal Cracks”: Montgomery’s 21st Army Group in Northwest Europe, 1944–45 (Mechanicsburg, PA., Stackpole, 2007)), and ‘Indoctrinated Nazi Teenaged Warriors: The Fanaticism of the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend in Normandy, 1944′, in M. Hughes and G. Johnson (eds.), Fanaticism and Conflict in the Modern Age (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004), pp. 81–100. Dr Hart has conducted battlefield studies and staff rides to a variety of audiences, including the British Army High Command in Exercise NORMAN WARRIOR in February 2012.

Alan Jeffreys is Senior Curator, Social History at the Imperial War Museum. He is author of The British Army in the Far East, 1941-45 (2005), co-editor of The Indian Army 1939-47: Experience and Development (2012) and co-editor of an academic historical series entitled ‘India at War’ with Helion.

Iain Johnston is a PhD candidate at Christ’s College, University of Cambridge, under the supervision of Professor David Reynolds. His thesis, ‘The Contribution of the Dominions, 1939-45’ explores the fundamental importance of the British dominions – Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa – to British strategy in the Second World War. It looks at four key areas of the dominion contribution: merchant shipping, the Eighth Army, air training and financing the British war effort. The thesis also considers the issues of national and British identities in the dominion armed forces. Previously he received his BA (Hons) from the University of Stirling and MPhil from the University of Cambridge. In addition to military history his research interests include imperial and commonwealth history.

Dr Ben Jones

Phil McCarty is a PhD candidate at the University of Wolverhampton where he is working on a thesis concerning the British Expeditionary Force and Norway Expeditionary Force in 1940 unders the supervision of Professors John Buckley and Stephen Badsey. His first degree was in Military Studies from the University of Manchester in 1983; then went to King’s College London for the MA in War Studies under Lawrence Freedman, Brian Bond and Mike Dockrill in 1983-84. From 1984-86 worked in the Research Department of the Royal United Services Institute; left this to become a Research Officer in the Ministry of Defence in 1986. Seconded to the Foreign & Commonwealth Office’s Research Analyst cadre from 2006-2009. He is a member of the British Commission for Military History and a member of the Council of the Society of Friends of the National Army Museum.

Sarah McCook

Dr Ross Mahoney is the Royal Air Force Museum’s resident Aviation Historian. He holds a Ph.D. and MPhil in Modern History from the University of Birmingham as well as a PGCE and BA from the University of Wolverhampton. He is currently writing a social and cultural history of the RAF’s officer class from 1918 to 1939 as well as researching the Service’s military culture. Broadly defined, he is a historian of warfare in the twentieth century with particular research interests in air power and aviation history, leadership, command and morale, military culture and the history of professional military education. Additionally, through his professional experience, he has developed an interest in public history. To date, he has published two edited volumes; first, in 2014, he co-edited a volume on military transformation in the British military entitled A Military Transformed? Adaptation and Innovation in the British Military, 1792-1945. More recently, in 2015, he edited a volume entitled the First World War in the Air, which supports the RAF Museum’s Heritage Lottery Funded exhibition of the same name. He can be found on Twitter here while his personal webpage can be found at Thoughts on Military History.

Dr Christopher Mann

Simon Moody is an AHRC funded PhD candidate at the Defence Studies Department, King’s College London at the Joint Services Command and Staff College. His thesis focuses on the British Army thinking, use and development of nuclear weapons during the early Cold War era. His supervisor are Dr Robert Foley and Dr Stuart Griffin. He spent the first year of his doctoral studies at the University of Liverpool, 2011-12. Prior to that, he received an MA with Distinction in Modern History from the University of Leeds in 2011 and a BA (Hons) 1st Class in Contemporary Military and International History from the University of Salford in 2010. His research interests can be broadly defined as the history of strategic thought, theories of war, nuclear strategy, and British defence policy after 1945. His first article, entitled, ‘Tactical Nuclear Weapons and Anglo-American Army Innovation during the 1950s’, was published in Arbeitskreis Militärgeschichte e. V. in 2011.

Stephen Moore is a PhD candidate at Newcastle University. His thesis is entitled, ‘After the Blitz: Luftwaffe Operations over the United Kingdom after May 1941’, under the supervision of Dr Claudia Baldoli and Dr Martin Farr. This study examines the continuing operations of the Luftwaffe and challenges the conventional view that subsequent attacks on the UK were insignificant. A holistic approach to the bombing will be used, with the military, social and political effects of bombing on British policy and night air defence being assessed, together with the subsequent influence of British bombing policy on German doctrine from 1942. Previously he received a MA with Merit in European History from Newcastle University in 2012. His research interests include the development of strategic bombing, RAF operations during the Second World War, and the military application of scientific developments. He is a member of the Royal Air Force Historical Society.

Air Commodore Dr Neville Parton

Daniel Pilfold

Adam Prime is a Ph.D. candidate and tutor at the University of Leicester. His thesis is a study of the Indian Army’s British officer corps between 1861 and 1921. He has previously researched the British and Commonwealth forces’ experience and performance during the Malaya Campaign and Fall of Singapore. He gained his BA in Contemporary Military and International History from the University of Salford and MA in Military History from the University of Chester. He can be found on Twitter here and on Academia.edu.

Matthew Powell

Peter Randall is a PhD candidate at the Graduate Institute of Politics and International Relations, University of Reading. His thesis examines and compares the formulation, dissemination, application and reformulation of the doctrines of the British and German armies between the years 1933 and 1945. Before beginning study for his PhD, he received an MA (Res) with distinction in International Security Studies and a BA in War, Peace and International Relations both from the University of Reading. He has a written a chapter on changes in the post-Napoleonic British Army to be published in Michael LoCicero, Ross Mahoney and Stuart Mitchell (eds.), A Military Transformed?: Adaptation and Innovation in the British Military, 1792-1945 (Solihull: Helion and Company, forthcoming (2013)). Aside from military history, his research interests include strategic theory and security studies. He can be found on Twitter here.

Dr Klaus Schmider

Professor Gary Sheffield

Dr Edward Smalley is an independent scholar who studied at the University of Kent and has a PhD and a BA (Hons) degree in history. His main academic interest is military history, particularly the inter-war and the Second World War period. His first book The British Expeditionary Force 1939-40 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) is being published in May 2015 to coincide with the 75th anniversary of Dunkirk.

Dr Andrew Stewart  is currently a Senior Lecturer and the Land Warfare Historian supporting the Higher Command and Staff Course based within the Defence Studies Department, King’s College London at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, a part of the UK’s Defence Academy. His historical research examines various issues connected to the Second World War. His first book – Empire Lost: Britain, the Dominions and the Second World War – examined coalition relations during the conflict. A second volume of essays examining the broader British experience of the Second World War – A Very British Experience – was published in September 2012. He has also written a number of peer-reviewed articles and was the co-editor of the first two volumes of the ‘Diplomats at War’ project.

Jacob Stoil is a DPhil candidate at Worcester College, University of Oxford. His dissertation explores indigenous forces in the Middle East and Horn of Africa during the Second World War. Prior to his DPhil Jacob completed his MA and BA at King’s College London in the Department of War Studies. His recent publications include ‘Structures of Cooperation and Conflict – Local Forces in Mandatory Palestine’ published in Ex Historia. Jacob’s research interests include irregular forces, peripheral campaigns, military adaptation in the developing world, and Middle Eastern military history, as well as how themes interacted in the broader context of the Second World War. Jacob is also member of the British Empire at War. Research Group.

Trevor Stone is a PhD candidate at the University of Exeter under the supervision of Professor Richard Overy. His thesis, ‘Royal Air Force Logistics during the Second World War: An Air Power Enabler’ examines a much neglected aspect of air power study and considers how the RAF’s logistics organization developed and the role it played, during the period from the expansion programme of the mid-1930s, through to the end of the war. His research interests include air power history, military logistics and the economics of air warfare. He is Historian of the Royal Air Force Logistics Branch, Director of the Logistics Heritage Centre at RAF Halton and a member of the Royal Air Force Historical Society.

Dr Simon Trew is currently (July 2013) serving as acting head in the Department of War Studies at The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. His main research interests lie in the areas of the Normandy and North-West European campaigns (1944-5), the Second World War in the Balkans (1941-5), urban operations, and the history of war photography. He wrote his PhD (1992) on British policy towards the wartime Chetnik resistance movement in Yugoslavia, which was published by Macmillan Press in 1998 as Britain, Mihailovic and the Chetniks, 1941-42. Most recently, he has produced a thematic study of war photography – and of the photographers who produced this work – from the 1944 Normandy battles, D-Day and the Battle of Normandy: A Photographic History (Haynes, 2012). Dr Trew has made numerous visits to conflict sites around the world, often as a battlefield study guide for British Army personnel, and has acted as historical consultant or contributor to several dozen television documentaries and live broadcasts. His profile can be found here.

Andrew Wheale

Alexander Wilson is a PhD Candidate at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. He is currently writing a thesis on the Indian Army in Africa and the Mediterranean during the Second World War, supervised by Professor Brian Holden Reid (War Studies) and Professor Ashley Jackson (Defence Studies). Before this he received an MA with Distinction in the History of Warfare (KCL) and a BA (Hons) in History at York, where he also volunteered as a curatorial assistant at the Kohima Museum. His research interests concern the history of British and Imperial warfare, conflict in South Asia and around the Indian Ocean. His first book chapter, ‘Mechanization and the Test of Battle: The Indian Cavalry, 1939-41’, is in the preparatory stages of publication. He is an Associate Member of the British Commission for Military History, a member of the British Empire at War Research Group and a member of the Jullundur Brigade Association.

2 responses to “Members

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  2. Pingback: The Second World War Military Operations Research Group needs you! | Birmingham "On War"·

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